When you cook the rice, you’re just eating a different kind of rice

In a city where people are forced to eat at restaurants on the street, a common practice in the West Bank is to buy rice from the store.

It’s an effort to save money for future purchases.

But when it comes to the rice you’re buying, what exactly is it?

The question is an increasingly important one in the context of Israel’s occupation.

Since the beginning of the occupation, Palestinians in the occupied territories have been buying rice from a range of stores.

A recent report by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) found that some 2,700 Palestinians in occupied West Bank communities are buying rice and other staples from stores.

This amounts to roughly one-third of the daily ration of rice and some two-thirds of the food eaten by Palestinians in Israeli-controlled territory.

The majority of these purchases are made at the local supermarket or from shops in the settlement of Pisgat Ze’ev.

The supermarkets also sell other staples like flour, oil and sugar.

But despite the availability of cheap food in the settlements, the people of the occupied West Wall are increasingly concerned about what to do with the leftover food.

“What we have is a huge problem,” said Shaul Givon, a resident of Pisgah, a West Bank village where many of the stores are located.

“When we get the food that we need, it’s not enough for us to eat.

We are not going to eat that food.

We need something else to eat.”

Givons son, Yasser, works in the grocery store, which is owned by a local resident.

His father is a driver for a nearby store, but he is also a resident and earns enough money to live off of.

“The grocery store is closed on Fridays, and I have to work,” said Yasser.

‘We’re still not in control’ The majority are Israelis who work in the communities that are under occupation, but Palestinians living in the territory are also affected. “

It’s a little hard to understand, but they don’t pay us.”

‘We’re still not in control’ The majority are Israelis who work in the communities that are under occupation, but Palestinians living in the territory are also affected.

In a report published in May by the OCHA, the UN agency that coordinates aid to the Palestinian territories, about 80% of households in the Gaza Strip were living in poverty, with many people struggling to feed their families and pay for food.

Givot Ze’ehim is a neighbourhood where a recent increase in the number of Palestinian settlers and Palestinians in Pisgat was evident.

“We’re not in charge,” said Givor Ze’ehed, a 40-year-old Palestinian who is the head of the Pisgat Youth Association.

“I work in my shop, I’m the manager, I do all the sales, I cook all the food, but we don’t get paid.”

He said he was not allowed to work because he does not have a permit.

“If we don [work], the settlers will come to us and ask for a permit,” he said.

“But I can’t even go out, because they say that I’m not allowed here.

“My shop is not a big store. “

The only reason I sell it is that I have enough money left for next week,” he told Al Jazeera. “

My shop is not a big store.

The only reason I sell it is that I have enough money left for next week,” he told Al Jazeera.

The shops that are open are closed on Friday evenings, and many of them are closed between 9 pm and midnight.

The OCHA report found that over half of Pisgpah’s households were unable to meet their daily calorie needs, and most households had to pay for a meal at least once a day.

But with limited access to other foodstuffs, the majority of Pisgaqas children are left with the choice of buying food at the store, or going to the local canteen, which serves the same food but only has the right to sell it for a higher price.

The children of Pisagat Ze’ezehim do not know how they will feed their children when they can no longer afford to buy food.

They do not have access to health care or education, and the lack of a basic standard of living means they can barely survive on the meager wages they earn.

In the villages around Pisgat, the number one problem faced by the community is the lack and lack of access to clean water.

“There are no sewage plants in Pisgata Ze’eshim, and when we get water, we’re told, ‘We don’t need water.

It is contaminated,'” said Shlomi, who works in a nearby community.

“Our sewage system is very badly damaged, and we can’t get the water that we use.

We have to buy water from the nearby settlement of